Penitencia Creek Trail

$400,000

open space authority funds contributed to project

2002

project awarded

The Open Space Authority has contributed $265,284 toward Reach 1 of the Penitencia Creek Trail. This section stretches from Alum Rock Park to Noble Avenue. The trail will follow one of the few urban creeks in the county that flows through its natural channel, offering visitors a chance to observe a riparian ecosystem.
Award Date:
December 11, 2002
Program:
20% Funding Program
Location:
East San Jose

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