Albertson Parkway

$400,000

open space authority funds contributed to project

2007

project awarded

The Authority contributed $400,000 to help the City of San Jose transform a neglected utility corridor into a recreational parkway with a meandering trail and landscaping that includes many native plants. Interpretive signage describes bio-retention swales that are part of the project and tell the story of Gary Albertson, a highway safety activist. The parkway is named in his memory.
Award Date:
December 12, 2007
Program:
20% Funding Program
Location:
Santa Teresa neighborhood

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