The Master Gardener Community Education Center

$132,353

open space authority funds contributed to project

2017

project awarded

The Master Gardener Community Education Center at Martial Cottle Park: Supporting the Environment at Your Own Home is a project that will create a multi‐generational Community Educational Center that will help individuals and families to become stewards of nature and to grow healthy food year‐round using environmentally sound gardening practices.
Award Date:
November 9, 2017
Program:
Measure Q Urban Open Space Grant Program
Location:
5283 Snell Ave San Jose, CA 95136

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