San Francisco Bay Wildlife Society: Tai Chi and Family Yoga

$6,005

open space authority funds contributed to project

2018

project awarded

The Authority helped to fund the San Francisco Bay Wildlife Society’s Tai Chi and Family Yoga, which will provide weekly and monthly programming to Bay Area families. Participants will benefit physically and mentally by experiencing a low-impact form of exercise surrounded by nature and wildlife. Hosting these types of programs at the Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge will also foster a sense of community among participants, allowing them to feel connected to each other, which also aids in their connection to the natural resources. In addition to exercise during these programs, attendees will also participate in nature walks where they will learn about the Refuge, habitats surrounding the Bay, wildlife that rely on these habitats, and their importance to the ecosystem.
Award Date:
May 24, 2018
Program:
Measure Q Environmental Education Grant Program
Location:
1751 Grand Blvd, Alviso, CA 95002

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