Outdoor Environmental Education for Title One Students

$22,038

open space authority funds contributed to project

2018

project awarded

The Authority contributed funds to Guadalupe River Park Conservancy’s field trip program that allows for inquiry-based learning. The program is committed to getting children outdoors and uses Guadalupe River Park & Gardens' river, rose garden, and orchard as an outdoor lab. The program prioritizes serving Title One students and connects them to their local environment while providing hands-on science lessons that teachers cannot deliver inside their classrooms
Award Date:
June 14, 2018
Program:
Measure Q Environmental Education Grant Program
Location:
Guadalupe River Park & Gardens

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