Bay Area Ridge Trail Council: Feasibility Study

$62,122

open space authority funds contributed to project

2018

project awarded

While there are many trails in the Santa Clara Valley, none connect the Santa Cruz Mountains to the Diablo Range and tie the Santa Clara Valley into the Bay Area Ridge Trail, a 375-mile network of trails that unites the ridges circling the Bay Area. The Authority is helping to fund the Bay Area Ridge Trail Council’s feasibility study to consider and identify a preferred Ridge Trail alignment between Santa Teresa County Park and the Coyote Creek Trail as part of ongoing efforts to fix this South Bay “trail-gap.”
Award Date:
May 9, 2018
Program:
Measure Q Urban Open Space Grant Program
Location:
Northern Coyote Valley

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