History

2017
2017
2017
Open Space Authority became the first public agency to receive accreditation from the Land Trust Alliance.

The Authority released the Coyote Valley Landscape Linkage report, highlighting the importance of Coyote Valley for wildlife survival and diversity.
2016
2016
2016

Santa Clara County Open Space Authority changed
its name to Santa Clara Valley Open Space Authority and gained ability to acquire land beyond the current jurisdiction.

Researchers confirmed Coyote Valley as a Critical Wildlife Movement Linkage, providing a path for wildlife to move between the Santa Cruz and Diablo mountain range.

The Authority released Understanding Our Community, a report identifying six neighborhoods with significant barriers to open space access. By focusing on these neighborhoods the Agency can ensure all jurisdiction residents are served equally.

The Authority launched the Urban Open Space Grant Program, providing grants to projects that will help people connect to nature and access open space in their own neighborhoods.

2015
2015
2015
Coyote Valley Open Space Preserve opened to the public.
2014
2014
2014

The Agency unveiled the Santa Clara Valley Greenprint, a 30-year conservation vision for Santa Clara County.

Healthy Lands & Healthy Economies Initiative study valued the “natural capital” of the Santa Clara Valley at over $160 billion.

Opened a new parking lot with panoramic views of the valley at the top of Sierra Vista Open Space Preserve.

Third funding measure passed (Measure Q), with strong support from voters.

2011
2011
2011
Opened six miles of new trail at Sierra Vista Open Space Preserve. The Open Space Authority now has ten miles of trails that connect to the Bay Area Ridge Trail.
2010
2010
2010
Purchased Coyote Valley Open Space Preserve.
2005
2005
2005
Opened new staging at Rancho Cañada del Oro Open Space Preserve. This space includes direct access to trails, paved parking, an equestrian area, and a vault toilet.
2004
2004
2004
First preserve open to the public: Rancho Cañada del Oro Open Space Preserve.
2002
2002
2002
First conservation easement under Authority management: Silacci easement.
2001
2001
2001
Second funding measure passed with 50.9% of the vote.

First trail opened to the public: Boccardo Trail at Sierra Vista Open Space Preserve.
2000
2000
2000
Acquired Sierra Vista and Rancho Cañada del Oro open space preserves.
1999
1999
1999
First property purchased: Palassou.

First funds granted under the “20% Funding for Urban Open Spaces” program to cities of San Jose and Santa Clara.
1995
1995
1995
First scenic easement gifted by Midpeninsula Regional Open Space District: LaPoint.
1994
1994
1994
Voters from across the jurisdiction elected seven members to the Open Space Authority Board of Directors. The Board held their first official meeting on June 27.

First funding measure passed with 57% of the vote.
 
1993
1993
1993
Interim Open Space Authority Governing Board created. The County of Santa Clara joined the Authority along with the Cities of San Jose, Campbell, Santa Clara, Milpitas, and Morgan Hill.
1992
1992
1992
Governor Pete Wilson signed a legislative bill to create the Open Space Authority. The bill did not include a funding mechanism.
1987
1987
1987
San Jose/Santa Clara County Joint Open Space Implementation Committee formed to implement the Preservation 2020 Task Force recommendations.
1985-87
1985-87
1985-87
Two local conservation groups, the San Jose Hillside and Greenbelt Task Force and the Santa Clara County Preservation 2020 Task Force, released reports recommending forming and funding a new open space district to acquire open space beyond the jurisdiction of the Midpeninsula Regional Open Space District.
1972
1972
1972
Midpeninsula Regional Open Space District was founded, providing public support for open space protection and land conservation in the San Francisco Bay Area.